Rachel Grant Coaching

April 15, 2014

A Beyond Survivor's Story: One Woman's Harrowing Journey to Healing - Part 2

This week, Jori Nunes, author of Chocolate Flowers and amazing beyond survivor continues her amazing story of survival.


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One of the things I suffered from in writing the book was whether or I not to use my own identity. In doing so, it could not only put my business in jeopardy but the few friendships I have. Recently, a client told me that I should not have the title of author on my email because people are likely to look my book up and see what I wrote. I asked her if she read my book and yes, she went on and on about how she couldn’t put it down and learned so much from it that she never thought of before. I asked her how she knew about it and obviously her answer was from my email. It’s not that I am forcing anyone to read the book but if you are meant to read it, I believe there will be a way for you to find out about it. 

Sometimes I wonder why I spent so much time and money on the book and realize I may never recoup that but I didn’t write it to get rich, I wrote it truly to bring awareness because although we all think it will never happen to our child, I guarantee you that all parents of molested children felt the same way unless it was the parents doing it which is rarely reported. As far as my relationships with friends, most of those have changed. I almost wonder if they think of me as someone other than the person they knew prior to me writing the book. I wonder, ‘Do they think I’m like that and can’t be trusted?’ I don’t want anyone feeling sorry for me. I am happy and always have been most of my life except during the dark times.

Today, I went to an appointment and the person I was about to meet with was so excited yet sad to tell me that because she read my book, she realized that her own daughter had the same symptoms that my son had when he was being molested that I noticed looking back to write the story: anger, withdrawing, personality changed, lower grades. She sat with her and discovered that her daughter was being molested and immediately reported it to find out that the young man assaulting her was also being molested and this is in the process of being investigated. I feel proud that I was able to stop something that was happening right in her own home from a neighbor friend having a play date. 

As a parent, I have made plenty of mistakes. The worst was allowing a person near my son who was a master manipulator, betraying my trust and taking advantage of my innocent child sexually, threatening him that he would kill his mommy if he ever told. The second was catering to this abused son and neglecting the needs of his younger sibling thinking he didn’t need as much care because he was not sexually abused. 

Twenty years ago there other were not internet support groups and I am now
overwhelmed by the amount of people who share similar stories and appreciate their friendship.

It’s been twenty years, why can’t I just get over it? I believe the answer to that is because children are still going through what my son had gone through. There are still parents who think this doesn’t pertain to them and it doesn’t involve them but when they stop and learn about the things I and other parents and grown victims of sexual abuse have to say, they sometimes learn that it has affected them in one way or another. 

Two years ago, I looked in to foster care to get a sibling for my youngest child who is now six. In doing so, I read hundreds of files from adoptable children who were all sexually molested by their parents. I wanted to take one of these children in but was not permitted to because I had a young child and all of these available children were ones who acted out and that would put my child at risk. It broke my heart, but already going through sexual abuse with one child I knew I couldn’t risk it.

Before writing the book Chocolate Flowers, I thought I knew myself well. My mother was crazy. My father was crazy. That was just how it was. I didn’t realize as a child or adult just how those crazy parents had affected me as my anger and depression worsened. I would often go to physiologists hoping they could fix me but not one of them ever dug in to my childhood to the ‘dark’ times even though I would say my parents were crazy. What is crazy? To me when I used the word crazy looking back I now know that I meant insane. My parents were insane and because they are the ones who raised me, I am different too. I would use insane but I do suffer temporary insanity occasionally when I am overwhelmed. If I have too much to do and people are asking me to get this done now, I do get anxiety. My husband and children do not deserve my insane anxiety moments and luckily they don’t happen all too often but when they do, I tell myself that it’s okay now, you are safe and you just need to get done whatever you can and  everything will work out.

It’s hard having a mother yet not having her in my life. My most recent memory of her before she died was of Christmas when I brought my husband and three kids over to visit her and my stepfather. We were excited and proud to have brought them a stainless steel microwave and when my mother opened it she was so upset because she had not bought us anything although there were beautifully wrapped gifts under the tree for Mothers friends and neighbors. We left with an unwrapped family gift of a used bowl with holes and the ink pen price of $3.99 still written on the bottom as I forced my children away from the many gifts as they were in search of anything with their name.


I never felt like an abused child although I agree severely neglected. I always felt like the sexual abuse was always my parents’ mental illness and never had anything to do with me. It’s very easy for me to disassociate and know that the young girl in that room was not me; it was a person who had no voice.

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Jori was born in San Francisco, CA and raised in San Ramon. Her birth father was an alcoholic, pan handler and dumpster diver and mother suffered from dissociative personality disorder and preferred to stay in her bed researching new diseases and diagnosing people with them since she was also a physic. Jori never spoke about the sexual abuse from either parent and had lived her life raising two children then married the love of her life and had another child. Jori tried to begin over and over with both parents but could never change who they were which was difficult and confusing for her.

Jori’s dream is to teach others what she has learned by writing the book, Chocolate Flowers, in hopes that the reader will not want to put it down but will also learn to detect a pedophile or abused child in hopes to help put an end to this silent epidemic and encourage others to talk about their abuse and not hold it in. http://jorinunes.weebly.com/

April 9, 2014

A Beyond Survivor's Story: One Woman's Harrowing Journey to Healing - Part 1

This week, I welcome Jori Nunes, author of Chocolate Flowers and amazing beyond survivor. Jori's story is unlike any other. It is a no holds barred story of abuse, falling down, and then getting back up and fighting for one’s self and the one’s we love. I know you will be touched and inspired!

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My name is Jori Nunes, I live in Modesto and was born in San Francisco in 1968. After writing the book, Chocolate Flowers, I became aware of the fact that I was abused although I never thought I was as a child, it was just the way things were. My parents were mentally ill so they had their excuse. I don’t remember when it all started with my real father but I often think of the things he put my mother and I through like the ‘Tickle torture’ and forcing her to act sexually to me when she would give me a bath. My father was an alcoholic and would love to buy everyone in the bar drinks leaving us without
money to buy food so he would take me out to panhandle and dumpster dive so we would have things and be able to eat. I have never had any of the traditional signs that I read in other people's books but I have always felt lonely and have twitches when I see, hear or talk about my past.

As a child, I was never forced to go to school so if I heard my sister getting up and ready I would sometimes  go too but my grades were barely passable and it wasn’t until the third grade that it was discovered I couldn’t read and was put into special ed classes. I don’t blame teachers because I didn’t tell them anything was wrong, it was just how things were. I do remember a teacher asking me about my lack of cleanliness and poor hygiene. She asked if I was being hit and yelled at in my home and my answer was always, "No, not at all." No one ever questioned me any further and I continued going to school when I felt like it. I don’t remember doing homework or how I passed classes when I failed all my tests but somehow I floated by like an empty shell.

Unlike most abused children, I was never scared at night because my step father would be home and I knew when he was home, I was safe. Mother was diagnosed with multiple personality disorder and admitted to having a ‘dark’ personality but would never talk about it. I knew that personality well, the witch, when she would actually put on a plastic Halloween mask and torture me in my room. My mother was my molester. That may shock people but to me it was just the way mother was. She had experienced worse; she would remind me and tell me the stories of her abusive mother and all the men that were in her life whom would sexually abuse her while her mother watched and would approve because they would pay her so she (my grandmother) could afford new furniture. My mother hated her, I hated her too so when she died on Halloween we laughed and sang ‘The wicked witch has died’ laughing.

My sister was treated completely different. Mother adored her and called her the ‘Gorgeous’ one. Mother constantly took photos of her and ignored my little brother and I. My sister was also abused sexually but that’s her story to tell, but I can tell you that mother forced her to wear bikini’s and sexy clothing, my sister knew to keep her mouth shut but learned to laugh at things as a nervous jester and had a sense of humor that not too many people understood. Mother groomed dogs and spent every dime on my sisters modeling career.

I was forced out of our home at the age of 14 because I tried to kill my mother. My mother had neglected me and only found interest in my sexuality allowing me to become sexual with men at an early age and asking me for details if she wasn’t included. I never knew it was wrong because I was doing it since I can remember with my real father. But when mother would force me to kill kittens and tell me stories of the hospice patients that she would be allowed to kill, things just got to be too much for me and one day I just had too much and threw her on the floor attempting to kill her.

When I found out I was pregnant, I was excited to have a son. I wouldn’t have to worry about a boy being sexually abused. My son's father was tragically killed in a car accident and never met our son, so I thought it was a great idea to have a male babysitter who could be a father figure to my son.

When my son told me that this man I trusted in my home with him had been making him suck his penis, I was so angry at my son for lying that I took away his action figures and told him that ‘Tim’ would never do that. I trusted him, he helps mommy and goes to our church. A month or so passed and my son was screaming from the bathroom. He couldn’t urinate, so I rushed him to the E.R. to be told he had a STD. He was six.

It took me twenty years to write the story, Chocolate Flowers. I interviewed pedophiles from Megan’s law and victims of crimes. It was a long journey to discover who I was and why. I am not a professional writer or a professional speaker. People ask me all the time why I wrote the book and the only reason I have is because I had to. I couldn’t escape the dreams to write it. After my mother died, my step-father called me to go over to his house. I made all the arrangements to have my mother’s body picked up and cremated. My step-father also asked me to take the sheets off the bed that she had her heart attack on and in doing so, I found a letter; To my daughter. It was a suicide letter telling me what a disappointment I was to her and how I had ruined her life. My mother is in a better place, she is healthy and happy and free from mental illness. My birth father is still alive although I never speak to him he will occasionally call and leave a message letting me know he’s alive and if I ever want to make any extra cash, he would be willing to pay me instead of those Asian girls for a sexual massage.

Today, I am a business owner of a Real Estate company in Modesto where I have been extremely blessed with my second marriage and my three children. I have no ill feelings towards the people who don’t believe that my parents were capable of doing the things they did because I too didn’t believe my own son and wonder what our relationship would be like if he never had a STD. How would his life be after being denied for his claim of being sexually abused? I often thank God that we found out and my son was able to seek justice. I wrote Chocolate Flowers for everyone who thinks it never will or never can. Thank you for learning about me and reading the book. 

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Jori was born in San Francisco, CA and raised in San Ramon. Her birth father was an alcoholic, pan handler and dumpster diver and mother suffered from dissociative personality disorder and preferred to stay in her bed researching new diseases and diagnosing people with them since she was also a physic. Jori never spoke about the sexual abuse from either parent and had lived her life raising two children then married the love of her life and had another child. Jori tried to begin over and over with both parents but could never change who they were which was difficult and confusing for her.

Jori’s dream is to teach others what she has learned by writing the book, Chocolate Flowers, in hopes that the reader will not want to put it down but will also learn to detect a pedophile or abused child in hopes to help put an end to this silent epidemic and encourage others to talk about their abuse and not hold it in. http://jorinunes.weebly.com/

April 1, 2014

Proud to Support: Somebody Else's Child


I am so pleased to share with you and to support Kari Kelley's amazing story brought to life on stage this month. I believe that our healing journey's are comprised of so many different experiences, self-expression and art being one of the most beautiful. If you are in the Bay Area, I strongly encourage you to be there to witness this woman -- I know I will be!!

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ONE WOMAN SHOW HIGHLIGHTS WOMAN’S HEALING FROM CHILD ABUSE

Kari Kelley Shares Story of Foster Care Abuse, Survival in ‘Somebody Else’s Child’

Given up for adoption at birth, a toddler lost most of her eyesight when she was shaken by her first adoptive mother, who did not take her to a doctor for a week and a half afterward. As a result, the child was placed back in foster care until age four, when she was adopted for a second time. In the new home, she experienced physical, emotional and sexual abuse at the hands of those charged with her care and protection, as well as other family members.

That child grew into a woman and, as a way to work through her own pain, depression, and anger, Kari Kelley decided to share her story with others. A year after publishing her memoir “Black, Blind and Female,” Kelley is taking to the stage to share her story of survival in the one woman show “Somebody Else’s Child,” to be performed at Sunnyvale Performing Arts Theatre (550 East Remington Drive), Friday, May 9 at 7:30 p.m.

Kelley was born into a world that tried to stripped away her humanity. Years of abuse left her legally blind, abused and spiritually crushed. Nevertheless, a desire to be greater than her circumstances burned deep within her.

“Somebody Else’s Child” brings the audience through Kelley’s very personal journey through her childhood and into her adulthood. She portrays many key characters from her life, from her pregnant mother contemplating giving up her child for adoption to the adoptive mother whose violence led to the loss of Kelley’s eyesight at fourteen months old. She also takes on the voice of the many emotions she experienced throughout her life, from anger to depression and ultimately peace.

“I invite you to join me on the journey that my soul has chosen for this life experience,” Kelley said. “This journey has not been easy but it has provided deep, profound transformation for me. This journey has made me the Gifted Messenger that I am today. As I share my message with you, I believe that your life as well as many other lives can be transformed.”

Kelley’s wish for her audiences is that they will be emboldened to express themselves if they are survivors of child abuse and that they will stand up to end the abuse of children today if they happen to find themselves as onlookers.

“I’m sending out a message that you can’t depend solely on bureaucracy to put a stop to child abuse,” she said. “I’m a product of broken, failed and overburdened bureaucracy. I was adopted not once but twice by two different abusive families…you have to protect the children if you want a healthy society for tomorrow.”

Tickets for “SomebodyElse’s Child” are available online and at the door. An early ticket price of $35 ends April 15. Following April 15, tickets are $45 in advance and $55 at the door. Seating is limited. The performance is for adults only.

About Kari Kelley
Kari Kelley is a motivational speaker who inspires others to be fabulous, regardless of their circumstances. She hopes to empower others to stop the vicious cycle of abuse and downward spiraling sense of self-worth that comes with it. She believes that every person she touches with her message can be a new creation of hopes and dreams waiting to be unleashed. Each of those people will in turn contribute their light and promise to the world to touch the lives of many for generations to come.

Kelley’s book Black, Blind, and Female: Inspiration to Overcome Obstacles was released in the spring of 2013 and is available in ebook and paperback formats at http://www.authorhouse.com.

Learn more about Kelley’s background at http://www.loveislimitless.com/index.html.

March 25, 2014

One Man's Journey: From Terrified to Transformed - Part 3

This week author and director Larry Enright finishes up his series and tells us about his amazing movie project that has been born as a result of his willingness to share his story!

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We have arrived.  My final blog in the series, just like my final book in the series Mad Man From Athgarvan Don’t Blink has brought me to a very important point. I, Larry Enright, have decided to do something about educating others about child abuse and helping Brain Aneurysm patients and their families by giving them the insight into my world and to show that healing is possible.  My book has generated a script that follows the stories within the book as well as other stories and thus my movie project was born.

My movie project, entitled “IF YOU TOLD”, is fully funded by donations and what myself and my family have been able to put together.  This movie is funny, sad, dramatic, kind, caring and honest.   If you haven’t read the previous blogs I will recap.  The movie’s storyline is about a young Irish lad’s antics while growing up in a small village in County Kildare, Ireland. The stories progress through his many escapades until he is an adult and finally arrives in America to live. And there more trouble brews and more funny stories evolve.

There is a serious side to this film and this is what makes this project worthwhile. It exposes child abuse in his small village and talks about the effects of a destructive undiagnosed brain aneurysm that changes my life forever. The hurdles I faced and my sense of humor helped me leap over my hurdles and move on; I know I can make you smile while sharing life’s reality. This film will definitely contains the elements that will teach you the power of laughter for healing. 

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of the movie will be used to help abuse victims as well as go towards research for the prevention and early detection of brain aneurysms.  The movie will help others who have befallen the same pain so that healing and support can occur!

If you should like to donate to the project contact me at ifyoutold@aol.com and we will provide you a link to make a donation.  All of our crew is currently made up of volunteers.  The donations will be applied to provide a small stipend to feed the crew, actors and actresses; rent camera equipment, cover any location fees, permits, insurance, set dressing, makeup, hair, wardrobe, music, color, sound and the list grows daily as the project moves forward. Every dime collected through donations goes towards producing a high quality, entertaining film.

Education, awareness and giving a voice to those who are afraid to speak is the greatest gift we all hope to give back.  Most importantly we want to give a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves!

Let me share the excerpt from my book:


Healing is an odd process. Sometimes it works with you and sometimes it works against you. I’m not sure if I ever completely healed. The anger still exists; the pain is still there; the physical weakness is still present. One thing is for sure though; the human body can handle loads of changes and the brain can reprogram itself in miraculous ways.
I’m never really truly happy though; I want more from my life than I am able to do and I want it yesterday. Perhaps you feel that way too. I always feel there is a great gap between where I have been and where I am that I do not understand. I wrote this book as a way of tracing my life and helping make some sense of it all. I hope it inspires others to write their journey down as well. Your stories are who you were. Don’t let your old stories rule you, make your life the present and live for each moment; you don’t know when things may change. Did you just blink? Your life has just changed again. Make sure you are in the moment!

So please live in the moment with me.  Help us bring this story to film.  Join us on Facebook.  Follow our page on Facebook ® The Voice Against Child
Abuse for updates on the project and contact us if you would like to join our community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ifyoutold/.  We make frequent updates to our project status there plus release other videos and share information and articles.  Thank you again for taking the time to follow me over the last couple weeks.  Again, I  hope you will find it in your heart to lend a hand and give a voice to those who cannot speak out for themselves! 



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Larry Enright is from County Kildare, Ireland. He is a singer, songwriter and author currently living in the United States. He has had many adventures in his life. He has performed for the President of the United States, Bill Clinton and his wife Hillary, as well as many other public figures like Elizabeth Taylor and the Kennedy's. Larry was married, has 3 children, many grandchildren, served in the Irish Army, worked as a Military Policeman, worked in security, wrote and produced albums and wrote three books. In his adult life, Larry faced the issue of the sexual abuse that he experienced as a child and then faced a massive change in his life while living here in the states. Larry collapsed, unexpectedly, with the rupture of an undetected brain aneurysm that left him needing to relearn all of his skills.

After all of his twists and turns he has dedicated himself to helping others survive abuse and has formed the group The Voice Against Child Abuse. He helps direct others to the resources they need to survive their own battles. He is also working on an independent movie project to raise awareness about abuse, survival and deliver the message that there is hope and even a little laughter in life. The movie is call "If You Told" based on his third and final book in the Mad Man From Athgarvan series "Don't Blink".


To order Mad Man From Athgarvan Don't Blink, click here.

To support Larry's independent movie project, go here. P.S. I'll be making a cameo appearance in the film!!

March 18, 2014

One Man's Journey: From Terrified to Transformed - Part 2

This week author and director Larry Enright continues his series and shares with us the impact the abuse had on his life and the role religion played in his journey.

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So as a child, I, Larry Enright, fought the battle so many children fight after being sexually abused. I was engulfed with overwhelming and intense feelings of fear, guilt and shame. My abuser remained in my immediate area which made me feel like I had done something to encourage the situation. I blamed myself over and over again. My abuser threatened to kill me so I never spoke up. 

What I was left with is a shopping list of issues. I had low self-esteem, self-hatred, depression, guilt, shame and an inability to trust people and a constant reminder of my abuse. I would block out my shame by imagining all kinds of things, acting out, making up stories and getting into fist fights. I think the worst of it for me was that I thought my abuser would kill me and my family. He had me convinced. Strangely enough, one time, in a brief instance I thought about telling my parents but I had a secondary fear quickly emerge. I feared my Dad would kill this man and then go to jail, and I would never see him again. So as a child you can see how trapped I really felt. The worst was yet to come and it would come in the form of sleep disturbances. These were daily and varied in intensity but every day of the week I would go through these. It was horrible and no one could understand. These two excerpts from my book show how bad it really got.
As a young child I was very afraid of the dark. Because my brothers were older, they often times were not home at bedtime. I would try to sneak into my sisters’ room to sleep because you could be guaranteed there would always be someone there. Sometimes I would get in, and sometimes I would not be so successful. With the bad dreams I used to have I had a hard time falling asleep; my dreams were frightening.
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As a kid I suffered with bad headaches and horrible nightmares. I remember one time while sleeping I had a horrible dream that the devil was grabbing me and I was floating around the room. I would fight and fight to wake up but it would seem like an eternity before I would wake up. I often would awaken and be sweating and crying. One time my Mam came into the room because I had been yelling in my sleep. I broke down and told her what I had been experiencing. I
told my Mam that this was happening most nights of the week. My Mam held me that night until I fell asleep and the next day my Mam and Dad took me to see the doctor. I remember his name, it was Dr. Canty. The doctor examined me. He asked me a few questions then had my Mam enter the examining room. He told my Mam that I was okay and that most kids go through this and I was a little hyperactive. He gave her some medicine to give me before bedtime. It tasted horrible rather like liquid shit. She gave it to me but it never worked. I told my Mam the nightmares had stopped but I was lying, I just wanted her not to worry. My headaches and nightmares continued into adulthood and the intensity increased dramatically. It would all make sense later but for now I would have to just live with it.

What I have not expounded upon is that these dreams were centered on fighting with the devil. In my mind I transformed my abuser into the devil. Nightly, I would yell STOP, NO, STOP…and no one in my family knew why. My religious upbringing made my abuser the Devil. This excerpt will explain the religious aspect of my life.

Religion was important to my family. Every day at 6 o’clock we would have to be in the house to say the Angelus. If we were out playing or whatever we were doing, we would get the call. My Mam would gather us all in the kitchen in a circle. The radio would be on, and it would ring out a bell tone. My Mam would then start us off with the sign of the cross and then start the prayer. It was a short prayer, so no one ever minded our routine.
Later, after supper, was another story. At night we would all have to gather in a circle again, this time with Rosary beads in hand, and in order to do the Rosary. There would be a lot of mumbling going on; I’m not sure that everyone was even saying the same prayer on the beads as we went, but it still sounded okay so we just kept going. My brother Eamon was the biggest “mumbler” of them all. When he would start I would giggle and then my Mam would hit me a crack on the back of the head. After my head would stop spinning we would carry on for you see my Mam and Dad were very religious people and serious about their prayers. Confession every Saturday and Mass every Sunday was second nature to us. To this day I will always remember the strength in our family’s faith which has remained strong in my heart as well.
I think at this point in my life I was so confused about my blame in the abuse, I even feared that God would think it was my fault.

I also experienced sleep paralysis which still occurs to this day when stresses in my life become a bit more than I can handle. But you also must remember I had an undetected brain aneurysm rupture causing me to battle brain injury as well, so I, at times, have issues sorting out daily stresses. Enough about that, let’s talk about sleep paralysis for a moment. Sleep paralysis happens for me when I am having a terrifying vision in my dreams and I cannot wake myself up nor move. I will call out and moan but I can feel my body lock up. If you should be going through this it would be wise for you to speak to your doctor and counselor. You want to rule out any other medical factors which may be causing this. There are ways to deal with sleep paralysis. What is good to know is that if it is only sleep paralysis brought on by stress that it is not dangerous. However, it does not make it any easier to deal with.


As an adult I adopted unhealthy coping mechanisms. I was constantly sad but faked it with laughter in front of others. I would hide my pain by abusing alcohol and some drugs but mostly I punished myself. I tried to hurt myself a few times, wanting to make the pain stop permanently and I struggle with bouts of depression to this day. I even still experience the nightmares though now I can understand why. 


Admitting my abuse has started me on a path of recovery. I will not lie to you, it is not an easy path but it is one you can travel. The first and foremost thing you 
must do for yourself is admit that you are worthy of happiness, health and deserve good in your life. Then you need to remind yourself that you don’t have to be a victim to your abuser anymore. You can put him where he belongs and that is give him his appropriate title: Criminal. What he or she has done is a criminal act. You would not punish yourself if you were robbed so you should not punish yourself for this crime either.

The battle of healing from abuse, which I learned over time, many people struggle with, made me long to do something for others. I started writing books about my experience, showing the funny, the sad, the strong emotion, the pain but the reality is that you can grow strong within yourself. My final book in the series "Mad Man From Athgarvan Don’t Blinkis the one that brings all the stories together. We have self-published the book and are using the proceeds to work on the next project which will be used to raise funds to help victims from Child Abuse and Brain Aneurysm Trauma. From the books, a movie project has been born and that is yet another story which we will talk about next time!


Come back next week for the conclusion to Larry's series and to hear more about his upcoming film! 



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Larry Enright is from County Kildare, Ireland. He is a singer, songwriter and author currently living in the United States. He has had many adventures in his life. He has performed for the President of the United States, Bill Clinton and his wife Hillary, as well as many other public figures like Elizabeth Taylor and the Kennedy's. Larry was married, has 3 children, many grandchildren, served in the Irish Army, worked as a Military Policeman, worked in security, wrote and produced albums and wrote three books. In his adult life, Larry faced the issue of the sexual abuse that he experienced as a child and then faced a massive change in his life while living here in the states. Larry collapsed, unexpectedly, with the rupture of an undetected brain aneurysm that left him needing to relearn all of his skills.

After all of his twists and turns he has dedicated himself to helping others survive abuse and has formed the group The Voice Against Child Abuse. He helps direct others to the resources they need to survive their own battles. He is also working on an independent movie project to raise awareness about abuse, survival and deliver the message that there is hope and even a little laughter in life. The movie is call "If You Told" based on his third and final book in the Mad Man From Athgarvan series "Don't Blink".


To order Mad Man From Athgarvan Don't Blink, click here.

To support Larry's independent movie project, go here. P.S. I'll be making a cameo appearance in the film!!



Resources, personal stories, communication techniques, and strategies for survivors of sexual abuse who are ready to break free from the past and return to their genuine self.